Staplehurst (disambiguation)

Staplehurst can mean:

Staplehurst in England
RAF Staplehurst, a World War II airfield in England
Staplehurst railway station
Staplehurst rail crash, a railway accident in 1865
Staplehurst, Nebraska, a small village in the United States

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Staplehurst.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

인천오피

Miranga

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Miranga is a rural district of the municipality of Pojuca, Bahia State, Brazil. It is located 74 km northwest of the state capital Salvador,_Bahia, and 22 km north of Pojuca city center.

Contents

1 Economy
2 Population

2.1 Culture
2.2 Religion
2.3 Ethnicity

3 References
4 External links

Economy[edit]
In the 1960s, Miranga area became one of the major oil prospection regions in Brazil, leading to the establishment of large facilities of Petrobras (the Brazilian state-owned sole oil explorer), including several rigs, office buildings and dormitories. The oil production entered decline in the 1980s, leading to a partial economic breakdown.
In the 1990s Miranga experienced a certain renaissance, when local politician Antonio ‘Biriba’ was elected Pojuca city representative. At the same time, a few young Brazilian entrepreneurs moved into the area and invested in rural property. They also adopted modern technology for dairy production and professional strategies for human resource management, which resulted in the marked improvement of the standards of living and overall social welfare.
Miranga now has a semi-urban area, on a hill nearby the entrance of the ‘farm corridor’. It has several stores, bars, two restaurants, a hostel and a catholic church on the top, dedicated to Saint Anthony of Padua.
Population[edit]
Its permanent population is estimated in about 1400, living almost exclusively from agriculture and commerce of agricultural products.
Culture[edit]
Possibly due to its high degree of African ancestry, Miranga’s people are very open and friendly, with a notable talent for music and dance. Almost every night there is a party somewhere (locally known as ‘seresta’), with folk guitar and drum players, dance and even amplified guitars and keyboards. Miranga preserves many aspects of the traditional Brazilian culture t

Lars Vilandt

Lars Vilandt

Curler

Born
(1974-08-22) August 22, 1974 (age 42)
Rodovre, Denmark

Team

Curling club
Hvidovre CC,
Hvidovre, Denmark

Skip
Rasmus Stjerne

Third
Johnny Frederiksen

Second
Mikkel Poulsen

Lead
Troels Harry

Alternate
Lars Vilandt

Career

World Championship
appearances
9 (2001, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013)

European Championship
appearances
6 (2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012)

Olympic
appearances
1 (2010)

Medal record

Curling

Representing  Denmark

European Championships

2007 Füssen

2011 Moscow

Lars Vilandt (born August 22, 1974[1]) is a Danish curler from Hvidovre.
He made his world championship debut at the 2007 Edmonton World Championships with a team skippered by Johnny Frederiksen. The team placed eleventh of twelve teams with a 4 – 7 record. He returned for the 2008 World Championships held in Grand Forks, USA. Team Denmark achieved another 4 – 7 record but this time placed ninth. At the 2009 Moncton World Championships his team placed fifth with a 5 – 6 record. These three results would be good enough to qualify a team to the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, Canada.
Teammates[edit]
2010 Vancouver Olympic Games
Johnny Frederiksen, Fourth
Ulrik Schmidt, Skip
Bo Jensen, Lead
Mikkel Poulsen, Alternate
References[edit]

WCT profile
Curlit.com profile
WCF profile

^ http://www.vancouver2010.com/olympic-curling/athletes/lars-vilandt_ath1017728fB.html

This biographical article relating to curling is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Yervant Voskan

Bust of Osman Hamdi Bey by Yervant Voskan

Yervant Voskan (Armenian: Երվանդ Հակոբի Ոսկան), also known as Osgan Efendi (Armenian: Երվանդ Ոսկան; 1855 in Constantinople, Ottoman Empire – 1914) was a famed Ottoman painter, sculptor, instructor, and administrator of Armenian descent.[1] He is considered the first sculptor of Turkey.[2][3]
Life[edit]
Yervant Voskan was born in 1855 in Constantinople, Ottoman Empire, son of writer Hagop Voskan (1825 – 1907), and grandson of Voskan Gotogyan of Erzurum who was a foundryman at the Imperial Mint.[3] After receiving his primary education from his father, he attended the Catholic Armenian Makruhyan School in Besiktas. In 1866 he went to Venice to study at the Murad Raphaelian School. He began teaching sculpture in the academy on March 1, 1883.[1] At the time, he was the only professor of sculpture in the Ottoman Empire.[2][3] He along with Osman Hamdi Bey conducted the first scientific based archaeological in the history of the Ottoman Empire. His archeological research included the Commagene tomb-sanctuary in Nemrut Dağı in southeastern Anatolia and the Alexander Sarcophagus in Sidon.[4] He was the chief restorer of the Sarcophagus.[3] Yervant Voskan eventually retired from the academy in 1908 and died only 6 years later.[5]
References[edit]

^ a b F. Ozturk, Nancy (2005). Eyüp Sultan symposia I – VIII : Selected Articles. Istanbul: Municipality of Eyüp, Directorate of Culture and Tourism. p. 112. ISBN 9789759384494. Retrieved 28 November 2012. 
^ a b Renda, Günsel; Kortepeter, C. Max (1986). The Transformation of Turkish culture : The Atatürk Legacy. Princeton, N.J.: Kingston Press. p. 136. ISBN 9780940670105. Retrieved 28 November 2012. 
^ a b c d Kurkman, Garo (2004). Armenian painters in the Ottoman Empire 1600-1923. İstanbul: Matüsalem Publications. ISBN 9789759201555. Retrieved 28 November 2012. 
^ Özdoğan, Günay Göksu (2009). Türkiye’de Ermeniler : cemaat, birey, yurttaş (in Turkish) (1. ed.). Şişli, İstanbul: İstanbul Bilgi Üniversitesi Yayınları. p. 99. ISBN 9786053990956. Retrieved 28 November 2012. 
^ Kasaba, edited by Reşat (2008). Turkey in the modern world (1. publ. ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. p. 427. ISBN 9780521620963. Retrieved 28 November 2012. 

Authority control

WorldCat Identities
VIAF: 125469932
GND: 142374229
SUDOC: 144741245
B

Rožna Dolina (Ljubljana)

This article is about Rožna Dolina in Ljubljana’s Rožnik District. For Rožna Dolina in the Municipality of Nova Gorica, see Rožna Dolina.

Rožna Dolina

Rožna Dolina

Location in Slovenia

Coordinates: 46°2′51.24″N 14°29′5.73″E / 46.0475667°N 14.4849250°E / 46.0475667; 14.4849250Coordinates: 46°2′51.24″N 14°29′5.73″E / 46.0475667°N 14.4849250°E / 46.0475667; 14.4849250

Country
Slovenia

Traditional region
Upper Carniola

Statistical region
Central Slovenia

Municipality
Ljubljana

Elevation[1]
295 m (968 ft)

Rožna Dolina (pronounced [ˈɾoːʒna dɔˈliːna]; Slovene: Rožna dolina) is a formerly independent settlement in the southwest part of the capital Ljubljana in central Slovenia. It was part of the traditional region of Upper Carniola and is now included with the rest of the municipality in the Central Slovenia Statistical Region.[2]

Contents

1 Geography
2 Name
3 History
4 Cultural heritage
5 Notable people
6 References
7 External links

Geography[edit]
Rožna Dolina lies west of downtown Ljubljana, between Rožnik Hill to the north, and the railroad from Ljubljana to Sežana to the south.[1] The land is low and swampy.[3] Glinščica Creek flows through the western part of the Rožna Dolina. Habjan Pond (Slovene: Habjanov bajer) was an overgrown area on the northern edge of the settlement at the foot of Rožnik Hill, east of 15th Street (Rožna dolina, cesta XV). Recent proposals to clean the area up and turn it into a park[4][5] have been carried out and the area is now a small park.
Name[edit]
The name Rožna Dolina (literally, ‘flower valley’) did not come into use until about 1904.[6]:21 It is ultimately derived from Rožnik Hill, the Slovene name of which is a translation from the German name Rosenberg, originally a compound of Middle High German rôse ‘rose’ and berc ‘mountain, hill’.[7] The hill is also the source of the name Rosenbüchel (or Rosenbichl, literally ‘rose hill’), a manor built at the foot of Rožnik Hill in the 18th century[6]:14 and also known in Slovene as Idrijčanov grad (literally, ‘the man from Idrija’s manor’).[8][9]
History[edit]
Rožna Dolina was originally part of the village of Glince in the former Municipality of Vič. The area was largely undeveloped until after the 1895 Ljubljana earthquake, when developers started looking for cheap land near industry to build housing for workers. The low-lying meadows in what is now R

Chalmers Award

Chalmers Award may refer to:

An early version of the Major League Baseball Most Valuable Player Award, presented from 1911 to 1914
a series of Canadian arts awards funded by the Chalmers family of arts patrons, including:

The Floyd S. Chalmers Canadian Play Award
The Jean A. Chalmers National Dance Award
The M. Joan Chalmers Awards for Arts Administration, Artistic Direction and Documentary Film and Video

Chalmers Medal awarded by the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Chalmers Award.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Callander railway station

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (October 2011) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Callander

Site of the station in 1986

Location

Place
Callander

Area
Stirling

Coordinates
56°14′45″N 4°13′06″W / 56.24590°N 4.21825°W / 56.24590; -4.21825Coordinates: 56°14′45″N 4°13′06″W / 56.24590°N 4.21825°W / 56.24590; -4.21825

Operations

Original company
Callander and Oban Railway

Pre-grouping
Callander and Oban Railway

Post-grouping
LMSR

Platforms
5

History

1 July 1858
first station opened

1 June 1870
Second station opened

5 November 1965
Closed

Disused railway stations in the United Kingdom

Closed railway stations in Britain
A B C D–F G H–J K–L M–O P–R S T–V W–Z

UK Railways portal

Callander was a railway station located in Callander, Stirling (district).

Contents

1 History
2 Signalling
3 Callander & Oban Junction
4 Sources
5 References
6 External links

History[edit]
The first station was a terminus opened by the Dunblane, Doune and Callander Railway on 1 July 1858. It was closed on 1 June 1870 when the second station was opened along with the first section of the Callander and Oban Railway, between Callander and Glenoglehead (originally named ‘Killin’).[1] The original terminal station of the Dunblane, Doune and Callander Railway become a goods yard.
The station underwent expansion in 1882.
Closure came on 5 November 1965, when the service between Callander and Dunblane ended as part of the Beeching Axe. The section between Callander and Crianlarich (lower) had been closed on 27 September that year following a landslide at Glen Ogle.
The track through the station was lifted in late 1968 and some demolition work was carried out; the track to the west of the station had been lifted in early 1967.[2] The station building itself was demolished in Spring 1973,[3] and the station site is now a car park, though a small section of the down platform still exists. The cast iron road bridge to the east of the station was infilled in 2012. The impressive iron-work on the bridge was refurbished at the same time as the infilling.
The site of the original Dunblane, Doune and Callander terminal station (latterly goods yard) is now occupied by housing.
Signalling[edit]
The enlarged layout of 1882 was control

Trimethyluric acid

Trimethyluric acid may refer to:

Liberine aka O(2),1,9-trimethyluric acid
1,3,7-Trimethyluric acid

This set index page lists chemical compounds articles associated with the same name.
If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article.

Al Qartu`iyah

Al Qartu`iyah

Al Qartu`iyah

Location in Jordan

Coordinates: 32°0′N 35°58′E / 32.000°N 35.967°E / 32.000; 35.967Coordinates: 32°0′N 35°58′E / 32.000°N 35.967°E / 32.000; 35.967

Country
Jordan

Governorate
Amman Governorate

Time zone
UTC + 2

Al Qartu`iyah is a town in the Amman Governorate of north-western Jordan.[1]
It is located several miles north-east of Amman.
References[edit]

^ Maplandia world gazetteer

External links[edit]

Satellite map at Maplandia.com
Search for Al Qartu`iyah in the MSN Encarta atlas

This Jordanian location article is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.

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Amman Governorate

Districts

Abu Nser
Al-Abdali
Al-Jeezah
Al-Madinah
Al-Moqableen
Al-Naser
Al-Yarmouk
Al-Muwaqqar
Bader
Bader Al-Jadida
Basman
Husban Al-Jadeedah and Umm Al-Basateen
Jubeiha
Kherbet Al-Souq
Marj Al-Hamam
Marka
Na’our
Qweismeh, Al-Jweideh, Abu Alanda and Rqeim
Ras Al-Ein
Sahab
Shafa Badran
Sweileh
Tareq
Tla’ Al-Ali, Khalda and Umm As Summaq
Uhod
Wadi Al-Seer
Zahran

Towns, villages and neighborhoods

`Abdun
Abu `Alandah
Adh Dhuhaybah
Al `Al
Al `Amiriyah
Al Bahhath
Al Bassah
Al Bunayyat al Janubiyah
Al Bunayyat ash Shamaliyah
Al Hawwasiyah
Al Hummar
Al Jumayyil
Al Juwayyidah
Al Lubban
Al Mabrak
Al Mahattah
Al Manakhir
Al Muqabalayn
Al Mushaqqar
Al Mushayrifah
Al Mushayrifah
Al Qartu`iyah
Al Qastal
Al Qunaytirah
Al Quwaysimah
Al Yadudah
`Ammuriya
An Nuwayjis
Ar Rabahiyah
Ar Rajib
Ar Riwaq
Ash Shufatah
Ash Shumaysani
As Samik
As Saqrah
At Tunayb
Barazin
Barzah
Barzah
Bayt Zir`ah
Biddin
Bilal
Dab`ah
Dhuhaybah
Hawwarah
Hisban
`Iraq al Amir
Jabal Amman
Jalul
Jawa
Juraynah
Khilda
Khirbat `Assaf
Khirbat Badran
Khirbat Khaww
Khirbat Siran
Ma`in
Manja
Marka
Mukawir
Mulayh
Natl
Qasr al Hallabat
Qubur `Abd Allah
Qurayyat Falhah
Qurayyat Nafi`
Qurayyat Salim
Rujaym Salim
Rujm ash Shami
Rujm ash Shara’irah
Sahab
Shmeisani
Shunat Ibn `Adwan
Sufah
Sumiya
Suwaylih
Tabarbawr
Tila` al `Ali
Umm al `Amad
Umm al Birak
Umm al Hanafish
Umm al Kundum
Umm al Qanafidh
Umm ar Rasas
Umm as Summaq
Umm Juraysat
Umm Nuwarah
Umm Qusayr
Umm Qusayr
Umm Rummanah
Umm Shujayrah al Gharbiyah
Umm Zuwaytinah
`Urjan al Gharbiyah
`Urjan ash Sharqiyah
`Uyun adh Dhi’b
Yajuz
Zaba’ir `Udwan
Zuwayza

Battle of Mine Creek

Battle of Mine Creek

Part of the American Civil War

A view of the Battle of Mine Creek, Kansas by Samuel J. Reader dated February 13, 1865.

Date
October 25, 1864 (1864-10-25)

Location
Linn County, Kansas

Result
Union victory

Belligerents

United States
Confederate States

Commanders and leaders

Alfred Pleasonton
John S. Marmaduke
James F. Fagan

Strength

2,600[1]
7,000[1]

Casualties and losses

100
1,200

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Price’s Missouri Expedition

Fort Davidson
4th Boonville
Glasgow
2nd Lexington
Little Blue River
2nd Independence
Byram’s Ford
Westport
Marais des Cygnes
Mine Creek
Marmiton River
2nd Newtonia

The Battle of Mine Creek, also known as the Battle of the Osage, was a battle that occurred on October 25, 1864, in Kansas as part of Price’s Raid during the American Civil War. In the second largest cavalry engagement of the war, two divisions of Major General Sterling Price’s Army of Missouri were routed by two Federal brigades under the command of Colonels Frederick Benteen and John Finis Philips.
This battle was the second of three fought between Price and the Federals on this day; the first had been earlier that morning at Marais des Cygnes a few miles away, while the third would be fought a few hours later at the nearby Marmiton River. Although vastly outnumbered, Union forces won all three engagements, forcing Price out of Kansas and sealing the fate of his disastrous Missouri campaign.
General Alfred Pleasonton, commanding the Federal forces in this engagement, was previously in command of Federal forces at the Battle of Brandy Station in the eastern theater; this gives him the distinction of having won a major cavalry battle for the Union on both sides of the Mississippi River.

Contents

1 Background
2 Battle
3 Aftermath
4 Documentary
5 See also
6 Notes
7 References
8 External links

Background[edit]
Further information: Confederate order of battle at Mine Creek and Union order of battle at Mine Creek
In the fall of 1864, Sterling Price led an expedition into Missouri hoping to capture that state for the Confederacy, or at least to negatively affect Abraham Lincoln’s chances for reelection in November. After a series of several battles across that state, Union forces under Maj. Gens. Samuel R. Curtis and Alfred Pleasonton finally defeated Price decisively at the Battle of Westport, in modern Kansas City, Missouri. Price withdrew south toward his base in Arkansas while Pleason